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Talbot Terrace

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On 11 Mar 2013 at 11:34am jennyb wrote:
What is the likelihood of Talbot Terrace flooding again? Just wondering what people think about this.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 11:36am Brussel Sprout wrote:
Call the environment agency to discuss the flood risk predictions for the future in Lewes. They were very informative when I was house hunting in Lewes.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 11:37am jennyb wrote:
Thanks for your help Brussel Sprout.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 2:21pm brixtonbelle wrote:
parts of it flooded in the past. Check out the EA website - it shows you the risk areas. If you are thinking of buying there, your local searches will also tell you if the property is at risk
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 2:24pm surveyor wrote:
It is at risk, and it is only a matter of time. It will flood again, either tomorrow, or in fifty years time. My bet is on a higher frequency of flooding.
The houses on the right hand side just about escaped and may do next time too; the ones on the left flooded. Buy on the right hand side (looking towards the steps up).
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 2:45pm Ben wrote:
I agonised over whether to buy there last year. I spoke to just about everybody possible. The bottom line was that nobody could tell me the magic words - 'No, it will never flood again' so with that i discounted anything in the flood zone which is a nuisance as there are some cracking houses within.
If you are taking the plunge as it were, then good luck with it.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 2:56pm Southover Queen wrote:
It's a problem, and quite a few of the "medium sized family houses" this town needs are on flood plains, aren't they? Have you found somewhere now, Ben? I remember you looking desperately last year!
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 4:23pm Ben wrote:
Yes thanks SQ, De Montfort Rd. Very happy and unfloodable! Loving Lewes, kids love it,wife loves it. Baxters field, Grange gardens, up on the downs, Castle grounds.....bloody magic place it really is special.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 5:32pm Shameus wrote:
I shall move to Lewes after my lottery win.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 7:28pm I don't live in lewes... wrote:
I lived in Talbot Terrace for much of my life and experienced the flood of 2000. As far as I know the powers that be have done zilch to prevent it flooding again. They have put in huge storm drains which run the length of the road which seems a good idea. However in the 2000 flood I watched water gushing out of the original drains hours before the river flooded. As the new drains are much larger they must have the potential to discharge considerably more backed up water.
BTW not all the houses on the RH side escaped. Those with steps (Nos 1 - 10 incl) were ok...ish but nos 11,12 13 + Talbot House flooded big time.
For me future flooding was a risk to many especially when there are alternatives.
Also worth remembering is that the LA in their wisdom are happy to build on the existing flood plain. Though the new builds are designed with flooding in mind it won't help the likes of Talbot Terrace. Fond memories aside if I was to be honest I‚??d regretfully have to say that I wouldn‚??t buy there.
PhilX
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 7:46pm Library Girl wrote:
We bought a house in Talbot Terrace last year. We also paused to consider the flooding issue but liked the house and the road so much it wasn't a problem for us.
In the end it's all down to priorities, but for us it was perfect because it's so close to town, and the Pells, and the playgrounds, and is in the catchment area for both Southover and Western Road Primary Schools - so we love it. Plus the road is a no through road so children can play out safely. The houses are of a decent size, and have reasonable gardens for the centre of town. There's a nice community in Talbot Terrace and everyone is very friendly.
I think the general consensus is that Lewes flooded so badly in 2000 because of a decision that was taken up stream at Barcombe, and that this wouldn't happen again. Last year was a very wet and rainy year, and Lewes didn't flood then - except parts of Bradford Road, which is off the flood plain ironically (water rushed down the hill from all sides apparently). Maybe nowhere is 'definitely' safe!
Also, wasn't a big storm drain built down the middle of the road about 10 years ago to reduce the risk of flooding?
We got Buildings and Contents insurance from the Coop for about £50 a month and it covers for flooding.
I think its important to consider things carefully when you're buying a house, but in the end it all comes down to if you think you and your family will be happy there!
I hope this helps!
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 8:06pm Billy B wrote:
Last year it seemed to rain solidly from May onwards. It didn't flood then, which isn't to say it never will - but it would have to rain more than last year (is that possible???)
If you wanted to avoid all the parts of Lewes that flooded in 2000 you have to forget about the bottom of Landport, Malling, Morris Road, Cliffe High Street, South Street, the road near St Pancras Stores, Winterbourne, Malling Street, Friars Walk, ... basically you have to live in the Nevill, or in an expensive house off the High Street.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 8:09pm peasant wrote:
The Barcombe Mills explanation for the Lewes floods is bunk, but do carry on believing it if it helps you. Lewes flooded in 2000, as it does at pretty rare intervals, because a vast downpour of rain coincided with very high tides. Does happen, but roughly every 40 years (twice in the 20th century, once so far this century). Pretty devastating these days if it happens to you.
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On 11 Mar 2013 at 8:11pm Local wrote:
Something of an exageration there, BillyB!
You just need to check which houses on which roads flooded, for instance a couple on Pelham Terrace flooded but the rest didn't as the slope up kicks in...
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On 12 Mar 2013 at 7:50am knowledge wrote:
Everyone knows that Lewes flooded in 2000 due to the decision to open the floodgates at Barcombe. It's a fact. This in conjunction with heavy rain and high tides. It's just a feak event that happened a long time ago.
 
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On 12 Mar 2013 at 7:54am jennyb wrote:
The Environment Agency are going to email me. I will tell you what they say.
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On 12 Mar 2013 at 3:15pm freddie thompson wrote:
I'm about to put an offer in on a house that flooded in 2000. It wasn't one than flooded up to the ceiling, it was less than 30cm. Doesnt bother me.
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On 12 Mar 2013 at 3:46pm I don't live in lewes... wrote:
Library Girl/
Though the storm drain is a large pipe it doesn't have the capacity of the River Ouse on a good day let alone when it's in flood.
The new drain may well increase the systems capacity for handling storm rain water (out bound water) but when the river flooded in 2000 the water was heading in the other directing exiting the drains and flooding the road. ie. backing up. This happened several hours BEFORE the river flooded the road.
I struggle to see how the new storm drain reduces the risk of flooding but I can see how a wider pipe has the ability to discharge even more backed up water into the surrounding area than the original.
PhilX
 
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On 13 Mar 2013 at 5:00pm mickyboy wrote:
I used to own a house off malling street, apparently in 1960 it flooded but no serious damage was done, it was only a few feet deep and not even the plaster was replaced as the flooding only lasted a short while. it flooded badly in 2000 and the ground floor was completely refitted/rebuilt. the reality is that despite all the river containment work that was done in the 60's/70's flooding still occured, and I believe that despite all the work that has been recently carried out it could happen again, once in every 50 years average is not bad, apparently in victoria times following the building of cliffe bridge flooding was so prevelant a covered culvert bypassed the bridge running through the brewery rear car park and my old yard in north court, the culvert started just south of the causeway where a wharf used to stand, I am not sure where it connected back south of cliffe bridge. I exposed it in the 80's doing some work it was brick about 1.5m wide and 1.2m deep located just below the surface. the difficulty is that by building up the river banks it restricts the traditional areas that would have flooded to take excess water. at my office in north court we raised the door 15cm because of backing up through the road drains of river water. this happened regually up to half a dozen times a year, the office and yard never flooded but the road way could be under water for up to a couple of hours. With the expansion of building and the practice of channeling rainwater (from roads & large concrete areas) away instead of into soakaways the water has to go somewhere, all of low lying areas of lewes are at risk of flooding, the price that is paid for living in a flood plain, best thing to do is ensure that insurance against flooding is available and move in, enjoy living there and dont worry to much. the next flood could be 40yrs or more years away.
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On 15 Mar 2013 at 4:58pm surveyor wrote:
The problem IS insurance. The voluntary legislation which insurers signed up to that kept the cost of flood insurance at an acceptable level expire this year and every indication is that it won't be renewed. Given how much insurers are increasingly paying out against weather damage, expect insurance premiums in at-risk areas to rocker over the next few years, potentially to unaffordable levels.


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