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Lewes bonfire

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On 8 Nov 2015 at 8:12pm Just interested? wrote:
Why is sussex or lewes bonfire so important to lewes people? Please post with honest answers. ¤ am doing a project with a social -cultural slant and would be grateful for your reply. Thank you.
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 8:29pm Horseman7 wrote:
Martyrs.
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 8:47pm Just interested? wrote:
So why the 5th, I know about guy faulks obviously, why the martyrs and why are they not remember the date that they were burnt. Would be a coincidence for it to be the same date?
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 8:54pm John Smith wrote:
Self-determination and free speech: we wunt be druv (no-one can tell us what to do)
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 8:56pm Rookie Ron wrote:
Maybe you should do a project on history first.
Firstly get the spelling correct
Secondly the 17 weren't all executed on the same but over a period between 1555-57
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 9:02pm Mark wrote:
It's a complicated questions and a good one. Protestants (like the martyrs) were populists, not royalists. Guy F was a Catholic -a royalist. Nov 5th celebrates the fact that Guy F didn't blow up Parliament. And gets blown up himself instead. Thomas Paine also figures large in the history of Bonfire. No individual in history did more to undermine the idea of the divine right of royalty to rule than he did. Look at the history of Bonfire info on this website for a start.
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 9:17pm Plumber wrote:
Guy was the first "fall guy".
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 9:46pm Just interested? wrote:
(John Smith) your reply suggests a feelings towards the riots, if I am correct the borough holds that same sentiment. The thought here is; if that feeling was uncontrolled it would possibly equal anarchy. Why would people celebrate such riots that occurred so long ago and remembered until present day.
(Rookie Ron) firstly apologies for my poor spelling and grammar, I have always found this to be a difficulty, I am more than aware of my failing in this department and need not others to comment on these failings any further. It makes me feel sad and weak. With regards to you advise to study history, whilst of course it has a bearing on my question, I am more interested in the question of why here and now people celebrate Lewes bonfire rather that what history has already told us. Once again apologies.
(Mark) Thank you for your reply, I am a bit confused, you mention Guy f as being a royalist, why on earth would he want to blow up king and parliament.
To all others the question remains why or maybe what does Lewes bonfire mean to you?
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 10:00pm Fred wrote:
Just Interested.........It means tradition, an expression of freedom, continuity with the past, respect, community etc. There is no simple answer, but lots of questions, so stand away from all that others might think and just experience Lewes as it is today. Read the history that has been written over the years. Make your mind up and enjoy the delving into a unique place.......
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 10:57pm John Smith wrote:
Okay, I'll try again. It's about refusing to take a path dictated by authority - picking up Mark's point about absolute rule, Lewes was the site of a battle which established the rule of council rather than an absolute monarch. Thomas Paine's thinking challenges the right of inherited wealth and privilege to govern - thinking which formed a fundamental part of two great populist revolutions.

For me, it is about the right of a person to decide for themselves their beliefs and aspirations and express dissent when crushed. Bonfire represents something very fundamental about the history of this town and its present community too: that's what I mean by self-determination and free speech. Fred's right: it's complicated and it probably means different things to different people but that's what it means to me. And it's pretty amazing.
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On 8 Nov 2015 at 11:54pm Spicey T wrote:
We won't be druv
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On 9 Nov 2015 at 1:57pm history ID wrote:
If you must know it isn't unique to Lewes, Guildford used to have a simillar riot with bonfire boys being called "Guys". If you look at the two towns they have very simillar history, they are county towns built on the wool industry, in the 1840's there was a divide in the rich and poor and political wigs and peers to, but now only the villages around Guildford retain the custom of bonfire today-mind you, you can't get anything started in Guildford it's so boring there.
The martyers were only introduced here as a focal point in 1911.
It has more to do with reclaiming your towns streets once a year just to prove that who ever you are, you have a right to the streets IMO.
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On 9 Nov 2015 at 4:59pm wigs and peers to wrote:
be burned next 5th. November, get your hairpieces out of the cupboards now in preparation. As to the Whigs that's another story.
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On 9 Nov 2015 at 7:20pm Just interested? wrote:
Thank you for your replies, Fred your post is a great reply and possibly the best way forward to understand why so many are so passionate about all things bonfire.
If I am reading this right there is some confusion as to why you do what you do, I guess it's a mix of historic events that are celebrated all under one heading (bonfire)
I wonder what parts of recent past will become future celebrations.
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On 10 Nov 2015 at 2:49pm Ed Can Do wrote:
I think if you have to ask you'll never know. If you really want to know why people in Lewes are so passionate about Bonfire, join a society and find out for yourself, there's simply no other way to properly experience or understand it.
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On 11 Nov 2015 at 1:57am Just interested? wrote:
To (ed can do) and others. if I were to apply to join a society to help me reach enlightenment, which one would you suggest and why..... I guess at this point it would be good if replies are based on the positive side rather than just another opportunity to knock other societies just fore the sake of it.
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On 11 Nov 2015 at 9:10pm Ed Can Do wrote:
Well I'm pretty sure Cliffe and Commercial aren't taking new members next year which rules them out and I wouldn't advise joining Waterloo for all kinds of reasons so either Borough or South Street would be your best bet as both are generally keen for new members, especially those who want to get stuck in and help out. Either that or join one of the village societies, all of which would welcome you with open arms I'm sure.


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