Lewes Forum thread

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Is Lewes dying?

 
 
On 28 Jan 2011 at 1:52pm Mr Forks wrote:
With the recent shop closures, lack of new employment and lack of new development in the town is Lewes slowly dying a slow death of a town coconned in the bubble wrap of a glorious past and stilted future?
 
 
On 28 Jan 2011 at 2:19pm kerry wrote:
yes
 
 
On 28 Jan 2011 at 3:38pm Hoodie Hugger wrote:
I think what it's really losing is its integrity. When we first moved here it was a proper market town with a thriving high street on which you could buy all of life's necessities; it was also a proper part of the wider community. Within a year of our arrival the farmers market shut down, and over the intervening years almost all of the local butchers, bakers and candlestick makers have gone the same way. Now the only things you can buy are posh knick-knacks, ethnic clothing and overpriced coffee.
Soon it'll be yet another 'museum' town - a pretty place for tourists to look at but with no life going on within it.
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On 28 Jan 2011 at 3:47pm 'ere be monsters wrote:
It'll appear on maps as Transition Town Lewes!!! Hopefully when they've ruined it they'll p*ss off and we can have it back.
 
 
On 28 Jan 2011 at 3:48pm Clifford wrote:
They never leave Monsters. They breed and their children come back from Oxbridge for the holidays.
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On 28 Jan 2011 at 5:50pm rotten review wrote:
Of course it isn't dying, its just changing slowly into an exclusive town for people who can afford it, and who can all drive to essential shops and facilities elswhere. It might change again, but the signs for now are obvious. maybe that's not a bad thing for some, but if you are an essential worker, a lifelong local, or just someone who wants to live in a small historic town, with some affordable facilities, it is looking increasingly worse for your long term prospects here.
 
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On 28 Jan 2011 at 6:05pm Mordred wrote:
Dying? Lewes died in the early 80's.
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On 28 Jan 2011 at 7:50pm SHS wrote:
It's not just Lewes it's the whole country!
 
 
On 28 Jan 2011 at 9:00pm MC wrote:
Someone has taken a cleaver to the UK an sliced it down the middle. There are those that the banks will lend money to and those that they won't. Those that can get new houses and those that can't. Those that can move to a new place and those that can't (unless it's cheaper). We've got this thing called the rich poor divide but that term does not do justice to what is happening now.
 
 
On 28 Jan 2011 at 9:23pm Cliffe Hanger wrote:
@MC. Banks will lend money to people who they believe will pay it back. Banks will not lend money to people who they believe will not pay it back. Nothing new there.
Yes, we live in a country where some people are rich and some people are not rich. That is what happens in a capitalist economy. I'm not sure why you are posting this to the Lewes forum. Are you advocating a form of socialism?
 
 
On 28 Jan 2011 at 10:12pm MC wrote:
You've not tried borrowing money recently then?
Irrespective of wages the banks will lend it only to people already with a good deal of capital behind them and won't lend it to those that haven't.
I'm posting this because it's an increasingly powerful factor in determining who owns houses in Lewes.

Not sure what it's got to do with soclailism. It's an observation, that's all
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On 29 Jan 2011 at 10:38pm Miscell Any wrote:
If Lewes is dying, it won't be because of the fact that some people are rich and some are poor. It won't be because the world is not fair. The world is intrinsically unfair - that is if you think fairness should consist of everybody having, and being, the same. That's just not possible. Some of us are stupid, some are clever, Some are poor, some are rich. Some are idle, some are enterprising. Some like to dream, others like to act. Some of us are men, some women. We are simply all different from each other - and instead of bemoaning the fact, we should celebrate if. So: shy not look at the current situation as an opportunity to dig out our resources? Shops closing does not need to mean the town dying. Empty shops could turn into theatres/swap shops/drop-in centres for - say - networking, or whatever - temporarily. Lewes could become famous for its empty-shop-art, or empty-shop-enterprises! Every change is both: the end of something that was, and also an opportunity for something new to begin. So there. Change does not mean death.
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On 30 Jan 2011 at 8:08am 'ere be monsters wrote:
"Empty shops could turn into theatres/swap shops/drop-in centres for - say - networking, or whatever - temporarily."
Not at £50k a year rent and £18k rates.
"Some of us are stupid," you're not wrong there!
 
 
On 30 Jan 2011 at 12:05pm Old Cynic wrote:
Lewes isn't dying its one of the healthiest and most economically vibrant places in the UK - after being away for a few days in one of the poorer parts of the UK (where every other shop is either shut down, vandalised or a charity shop - Lewes looks pretty bloody healthy! In fac it looks better than it did in the 80's.....
 
 
On 30 Jan 2011 at 12:59pm Clifford wrote:
Miscell Any wrote: 'The world is intrinsically unfair - that is if you think fairness should consist of everybody having, and being, the same.'

Where did you get this strange idea that fairness means everyone having and being the same? If you think about fairness for a moment you'll realise it doesn't mean that at all. Think about wartime rationing.
 
 
On 30 Jan 2011 at 2:11pm Grunge wrote:
When I first came to Lewes in the '70s it was dying. On Saturday afternoons the shops were pretty well all shut by 3.00. If you wanted any shopping you had to go to Seaford. Now, Seaford WAS vibrant - then. Lewes has picked up, though I wish there were more "sensible" shops and fewer building socs etc.
 
 
On 30 Jan 2011 at 3:41pm bastian wrote:
This all happened in the 1990's just the same,shops on the high st empty,what has changed is that it's harder to set up community events in empty shops because of red tape.Anyone remember Oakleaf Exhibition space,artists took over empty shops for a couple of weeks to show work,it at least made the town look full and alive.If you tried this now the agents would want a contract .It's worth a try if anyones up for it.
 
 
On 30 Jan 2011 at 5:32pm NewLewesian wrote:
I think Lewes is doing fairly well given its size and location. Most towns in the south-east are drab, characterless commutervilles; Lewes certainly isn't that. A lot of good things have started recently, like the Friday food market - incidentally run by those awful transition town people set on destroying the place. And Lewes has a disproportionate number of pubs given its size, all with different characters, and most seem busy enough.
I think Lewes has a good future. There are quite a lot of young people and young families here intent on keeping the place as a thriving community with local character and services. Most other country towns have no-one under the age of 60 living there and anyone young is dertermined to get out at the earliest opportuinity. That's not the case here.
Lewes could desperately do with a decent bakers and a decent greengrocers, though. I've lived in much smaller places better set up in that departmnet.
 
 
On 30 Jan 2011 at 7:43pm supporter wrote:
Lewes in the 60's was geat for shops,good butchers,bakers and the like and a lot more pubs than it has now.
Those were the days.
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On 31 Jan 2011 at 11:45am Milkman wrote:
When I left Lewes in '96 it was nothing but antique shops, charity shops and estate agents. I returned a couple of years ago to see this is still the case albeit with a few more niche shops too, but at least it's more independent traders. Over the past year though the supermarkets have in part harmed the local services on offer, but the people have helped them too. "Le Magazin" used to be great as a local shop for papers, bread & milk. Now it's a trendy Bill's-over-spill cafe. May's used to sell essentials, now it's yet another antiques shop. There is nowhere in town now other than Waitrose or Tescos to get a pint of milk, loaf of bread or other morning essentials.
Hopefully the airing of the episode of Bargain Hunt will bring more visitors, although no idea how many, if any, bargains they found in the Lewes antique shops.
 
 
On 31 Jan 2011 at 12:06pm Ed Can Do wrote:
I get my milk and bread from the Malling stores, a local shop for local people.
 
 
On 31 Jan 2011 at 3:59pm bastian wrote:
Don't touch the precious things
 
 
On 2 Feb 2011 at 2:49pm Miscell Any wrote:
Clifford,
"Where did you get this strange idea that fairness means everyone having and being the same?"
Of course it is not my idea of fairness - but it seems to be the idea of fairness that a whole lot of people seem to cultivate.....
 
 
On 2 Feb 2011 at 5:37pm MC wrote:
That's crap. It's about people being given the same opportunities. No one thinks everyone should be the same.
 
 
On 4 Feb 2011 at 12:22am popsgirl wrote:
The lovely town of Lewes will slowly look like the way that uckfield has ended up, empty shops and food outlets like mcdonalds in !!! Boring
 
 
On 4 Feb 2011 at 9:34pm citizen wrote:
The real shops have left because nobody shops in them. If we stopped shopping in supermarkets, we'd have more real local shops left, not just the boutiques. Stands to reason.
The friday market is good news - worth a visit and some affordable food tucked in among the fancy stuff.
 
 
On 5 Feb 2011 at 9:46pm out of town wrote:
Blimey, don't start taking a pop at Uckfield, at least the people out there don't attempt any ambitions to be anything but a 'normal' town.. Yes there's a MacD, but there isnt a Homebase, isn't a oversize Tesco, no parking restrictions, a wonderful independent cinema, lovely shops of all types... oh and bloody wonderful christmas lights. Leave them that do no harm alone...


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