Lewes Forum thread

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Children banned from pubs

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On 9 Sep 2015 at 10:40am Timothy wrote:
Your views on the matter? I personally think it would be quite a good idea.
Maybe have separate areas, I understand people go for family meals etc, which children are generally apart of.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 10:52am Earl of Lewes wrote:
Although I'm a parent, I have no problem with child-free areas, or a curfew after a certain time - I value a bit of peace and quiet.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 10:54am Slarty wrote:
After a set time (say 8pm), perhaps.

The problem is not so much the children but the parents that let them run amok. My kids know that a pub is a place for adults and they have to behave accordingly. Also, most parents will have the kids away from the pub by the evening drunkenness starts.

If the pub is a type that kids should not be in at any time of the day, then I think the landlord should make the decision (although some pubs in Brighton only have an Adults licence, so no kids at any time - not sure about Lewes licenses).

Why do you think it would be a good idea?
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 11:09am HeathClifford wrote:
No, terrible idea. Pubs are in enough trouble aren't they, without banning the few people who do want to go into them?
Where else are families supposed to go if they want a chat and a drink after 6pm.
The family trade could be a great opportunity for a business model that's been killed off by drink-driving laws, non-smoking and house prices that kill off most other expenditure, to reinvent itself.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 11:41am Just Me wrote:
A cut off time would be the way to do this rather than banning children all together. Pub i used to work in has a curfew for kids.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 2:08pm The Twister wrote:
Pubs are for adults. Kindergartens are for children. Why is it acceptable to take your children to a pub. If you make the decision to have children then you ought to stay at home looking after them. Not inflict them on unsuspecting drinkers having a quiet pint...
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 2:25pm Ducatipete wrote:
I like pubs on main roads so the kids came go out and play on them. I would ban women. Nothing worse to spoil a good pint.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 2:34pm Local wrote:
I would suggest that the decision on Pub allowing children is left with the Pubs Landlord and they know their customers and what market they are aiming for. The behaviour of the child should be left for the parents to control, and the Landlord should address any issues with any child's behaviour with the parents.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 3:44pm OffRoad wrote:
How about some pubs allow kids, others do. Surely we can cater for all.
I agree with the above though - families need to go somewhere. Last time I went to a "kindergarten" (are we american or german?) i couldn't spot a pint of Harveys or any food on offer. Maybe I'm going to the wrong "kindergarten".
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 3:58pm trooper wrote:
Greetings All.; I am a lifelong (a very long life) batchelor I have no family so no offspring I am also an only child,so NO siblings, and to be fair no great lover of "sprogs" I have to say however that as a frequenter of the local watering holes, I have found some perfectly delightful children, it is a matter of some regret that the same cannot be said for some of their parents.I for one do not wish to see the return to children left outside the pub at all with a glass of lemonade.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 4:14pm Rossiter Knew wrote:
My Grandparents use to take me along with them to the Pub in the late 1970's and they always locked me in their car with half a pint of Bitter Shandy with the window left open just a smidgen like I was their pet dog.. But thinking about it their dog 'ZoZo' a 3 legged White Poodle was treated slightly better than me..
I didn't get to where I am to day moaning about the dog & pubs..
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 4:21pm huw wrote:
I think Slarty has got it right. It's not really about the problem being kids in a pub but how the parents set boundaries for them and how they behave.
In my opinion it's a good thing for kids to learn how to behave in pubs as otherwise you can end up with some truly obnoxious 18 year olds walking through the door with no idea of the etiquette.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 4:27pm Rossiter Knew wrote:
I think that its down to common sense & respect for others..
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 5:48pm Annette Curtin-Twitcher wrote:
I can't bear kids in pubs unless they're exceptionally well behaved (which most aren't). But even I'd prefer pubs to allow kids in and thrive than ban them and go under. And I hold parents responsible for the behaviour of their children.
What really gets my goat is parents who expect adult customers to modify their behaviour because their children are present.
Someone arrived at a local pub with 3 kids in tow and sat at a table in the garden next to some friends. After about half an hour, the father came across and asked them not to smoke near their kids. They politely pointed out that the family had opted to sit next to them, despite the packets of cigs and lighters in clear view on the table, and suggested that if smoking was such a problem, perhaps they should have sat somewhere else. Like, in their house.
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 9:36pm jacko wrote:
Gardeners got it right. No kids just a plethora of smelly bearded old men. Proper boozer!
 
 
On 9 Sep 2015 at 9:53pm Kingshead wrote:
curtain twitcher
So have you got grand children ? No ? Lol , looks like you spend most your time on here trying to put the world to rights , Ms perfect
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 9:53pm Kingshead wrote:
curtain twitcher
So have you got grand children ? No ? Lol , looks like you spend most your time on here trying to put the world to rights , Ms perfect
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 9:53pm Kingshead wrote:
curtain twitcher
So have you got grand children ? No ? Lol , looks like you spend most your time on here trying to put the world to rights , Ms perfect
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On 9 Sep 2015 at 11:02pm Clifford wrote:
I have to agree - no kids in pubs. Kids in pub gardens in the summer but not inside at any time.
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On 10 Sep 2015 at 12:22am King shead wrote:
My kingshead hurts
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On 10 Sep 2015 at 9:40am Sussex Jim wrote:
Annette has got it about right.
I have no objection to QUIET children sitting with their parents. But they should not be allowed to run around; or occupy the bar stools.
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On 10 Sep 2015 at 11:03am Shifty wrote:
Pub = PUBLIC HOUSE!
If I wish to take my children to a public house in which the landlord allows them then I jolly well shall! My children generally behave better than drunk adults anyway!
What a bunch of miserable ol' farts!
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On 10 Sep 2015 at 2:10pm Clifford wrote:
That's okay Shifty. Just tell us which pub you're going to and we'll all know to avoid it. That should please the landlord.
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On 10 Sep 2015 at 2:17pm Shifty wrote:
Clifford I'm sure the landlord wouldn't miss you. I'd rather be with happy children than grumpy old men. When I want that I go to the Gardeners.
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On 10 Sep 2015 at 4:00pm OffRoad wrote:
ACT - that's a bit harsh. It's not actually possible to completely control kids, as they're independent human beings.
What bothers me is when parents are making no attempt to reprimand or control their kids when they are behaving badly, as if they either think they are more important or that it's all ok as they are expressing themselves.
As long as they are making some attempt - that's fine.
I often find with mine that they are fine for the first hour and then get restless. I am supposed to walk out half way through my meal?
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On 11 Sep 2015 at 9:58am Depressed/Fragile wrote:
Were any of you children once?


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