Lewes Forum thread

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outmeetings

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On 29 Nov 2015 at 12:19pm Emmanuel Goldstein wrote:
If the members of the Cliffe Drinking Society are going to behave as they did at Hawkhurst last night, then its probably best they stay in the pub. Where they belong.
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On 29 Nov 2015 at 5:01pm Sanka Coffie wrote:
Sounds fun. How does one join said drinking society?
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On 29 Nov 2015 at 5:40pm Dixie Normus wrote:
Wah wah wah
So boring!!! Moany moany
Sober bore
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On 29 Nov 2015 at 7:54pm Drinkapintabeeraday wrote:
Right on The Cliffe.
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On 29 Nov 2015 at 9:38pm Proper bonfire boy wrote:
I was always under the impression that the way to behave at outmeetings was to go straight to the nearest pub wearing my freshly washed stripey jumper, proceed to get drunk, laugh at the idiots in the parade, occasionally hurl abuse at the lazy non-bonfire walking groups, let off some nice blues and generally cause an entirely humorous headache for the host bonfire society. Oops also not forgetting to shout one of 2 very traditional chants of "who are we" and "we are the boys who say f**k all the rest". I'm afraid personally I just process, respect other society rules, have a couple of drinks whilst waiting and then maybe watch some fireworks. I wish I could be a real bonfire boy though !
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On 29 Nov 2015 at 9:59pm Fischer wrote:
I thought the Fishers got banned!
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 7:27am Knowall Fister wrote:
Ohh dear Mr and Mrs Fisher it looks like you have been sussed.
Tell me, would this be the same Cliffe that was thanked by both the chairman of the host society and the landlord of the pub at the end of the evening?
I have to say, SBS and the Fishers is a really good fit, they both deserve each other.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 8:24am Andy wrote:
Seems Cliffe increasingly fail to get bonfire.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 9:57am Paddy wrote:
... And yet they claim to own it!
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 12:52pm Mr Chips wrote:
Webbo, What happened to my post about Fisher & Chips?
It seems as though deleting posts on a whim which webbo inexplicably doesn't care for has become the norm.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 1:00pm Goodbye wrote:
Mr. Chips - I love the random way the "censors" work on here - I've slipped a couple past them by using the next post name to carry on from the name above - Better than doing the Guardian crossword.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 1:20pm Shaven Haven wrote:
His an oxymoron if ever there was one.
A Bonfire Boy who hates the Queen.
Only in Southowram.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 2:00pm Hirsute Haven wrote:
You's not an oxymoron just a plain one
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 5:01pm Slapped Arse wrote:
I can barely sit down
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 5:07pm wrote:
@Shaven
Are there any other things a Bonfire Boy has to be as well as a monarchist? Christian? Tory?
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 6:43pm Tom wrote:
Society that can barely drag itself out of the pub thanked by....landlord of pub.
Impressive
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 6:47pm Tipex wrote:
In my experience bonfire has nothing to do with the pro / anti monarchy or catholicism / CofE etc these days, nor has done for decades. Probably no bad thing.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 6:54pm Tom wrote:
I think it has far more to do with basic liberty. It originated in a commanded festival being taken over by the People. This is why we mock figures of authority. So anyone who says someone shouldnt be in Bonfire because of a political viewpoint is an idiot who has entirely missed the point.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 7:28pm Tony Pollybee wrote:
I'm guessing that Tipex and Tom are Southover members.
"Commanded festival being taken over by the people" I'd check up on your history if I were you Tom, I've never read so much crap.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 7:32pm True To Each Other wrote:
Tipex, have you not heard the second verse of Bonfire prayers?
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 7:38pm Tom wrote:
I suggest you educate yourself Tippex.
First google 'Observance of 5th November Act 1605'. Then read the books on Bonfire by Jim Etherington.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 7:40pm Tom wrote:
My mistake. I meant Tony.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 7:47pm Tony Pollybee wrote:
I am very much aware of the act of 1605.
Are you then saying that 'the people' took the celebrations away from the text of the act into a different direction?
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 7:48pm Tom wrote:
Yes I am. Seriously. Read Etheringtons Bonfire histories.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 8:06pm Tony Pollybee wrote:
I have read Jim's books and can only think that somehow, in order to ease your political bias you are interpreting parts of it in your own bizarre way.
The riotous years in Bonfire were not about 'the people' rebelling against the act, it was the way in which they were going about celebrating the failure of the plot.
If your theory is correct then that would make a mockery of Bonfire prayers and lots of the traditional aspects of Bonfire in general, certainly in the society that I am a member of.

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On 30 Nov 2015 at 10:37pm Tom wrote:
The point Etherington clearly makes is that the focus of the occasion was expanded by the People beyond the purely catholic targets intended by the act. And it was then that the celebrations were suppressed.
That doesnt mean, as you seem to imply I meant, that the original targets were forgotten.
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On 30 Nov 2015 at 11:42pm Tipex wrote:
In my experience bonfire prayers are recited in much the same way prayers are recited in church. Parrot fashion with minimal interest or understanding of their meaning. Quote Etherington to the vast majority of bonfire soc members and I suspect they'll look at you totally blankly. It's just marching about in daft uniforms and setting fire to stuff! Great tradition but also utterly pointless.
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On 1 Dec 2015 at 7:30am helibour wrote:
Tom you need to stop digging you are embarrassing yourself.
May I ask which society you are a member of?
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On 1 Dec 2015 at 7:44am Annette Curtin-Twitcher wrote:
I think bonfire prayers are the bonfire equivalent of the hakka for many.
I've been in bonfire for 18 years, and I'm an atheist and a republican. Admittedly, I tend to keep quiet about the republican bit at bonfire events.
For me, it's about dissent and liberty.
Lewes societies must have a few thousand members altogether. Like any large number of people, you will find a very large range of views and beliefs among them.
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On 1 Dec 2015 at 9:09am Slarty wrote:
The problem seems to be with people just doing bonfire for a laugh. It is true, it is fun (otherwise most of us wouldn't do it), but when people just do it for fun then the beer, bangers and oggie side will take over. Unfortunately, when some bonfire society committees try to guide their members away from such activities they get ridiculed.
I'm not saying that beer and bangers should be banned from bonfire, but if that is the main reason for going then, IMHO, you're missing the point.
I'm not sure what the answer is short of having lessons to teach what bonfire is about and making people pass a test before they can join a society. After saying that, there are many reasons why people do bonfire and I'm not going to decide which are right and which are wrong (except that *just* for beer, bangers and oggie is wrong).
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On 1 Dec 2015 at 11:00am Helicopter wrote:
Dissent and liberty? Not with the old Bill and their helicopter.
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On 1 Dec 2015 at 6:50pm Tom wrote:
Helibour, would you care to point out where I am wrong rather than being so ignorant?
As for my society, that is none of your business.


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