Lewes Forum thread

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Lewes Forum New message

off-am or oaf-am

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On 16 May 2012 at 7:51pm knee-the nigh-the wrote:
Talking about the petrol service station with various 'locals' i've noticed a disparity in pronunciation. The Lewes born or entrenched call the village oafam, those from the coast offam & some of those nice ingratiating ones from london say oafham with the 'h'.
so, seaford of seafud, brite-on or bri'un ?
awords heef. orsted keens, etc etc ?
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On 16 May 2012 at 8:06pm Petite pois wrote:
well...to sound posh I think Oafam is good, however as it is off hamsey then it is pronounced off-ham!
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On 16 May 2012 at 8:35pm Ross wrote:
I'd say that your dizzy and need to get down from your high horse! All people are different and how they pronounce things too. Especially if you are unfamiliar with areas you've never been. Knob! We can't (sorry, cannot) all talk like wanna be (sorry, want to be) upper middle class scum. Go take a long walk off a short pier you stuck up tool!
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On 16 May 2012 at 9:06pm Deelite wrote:
Crikey. What did he say to deserve that sort of retort?
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On 16 May 2012 at 9:23pm teacher wrote:
Ross I have told you before, get off the computer get your homework done and get to bed before Daddy comes home. This forum is for grown ups.
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On 16 May 2012 at 10:13pm Chuck wrote:
Petite Pois, you are right in that the name is derived from Off Hamsey, but as a local it is definitely Oaf-am! Ross, you are out of order. When in Rome, do as the Romans do, and that includes pronounciation.
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On 17 May 2012 at 2:08am AYATOLLAH HOGMANNY wrote:
Quite right chuck it is OAF-AM locally, only heard Off-ham since the 80s when the DFLS came down to this remote part of Sussex!!!! Ross, we cant all be perfect and "talk like what you was taught" I was born in Lewes, can you say the same... don't be so prejudiced against people of a different class than yourself!!!! We can't all be posh like what yous is!!!!!!!
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On 17 May 2012 at 8:18am vipalb wrote:
My Mother was born in one of the cottages up on the left hand side just past the Blacksmiths going out of Lewes. She lived there for 20 years and always pronounced it 'Oaf-am' although as rightly indicated by 'Chuck' above it is technically Off-ham being off of Hamsey..............now you can't get more local than her.
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On 17 May 2012 at 8:32am Pete wrote:
Oafam is fine by me, but surely it's Blightown for the other place ?
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On 17 May 2012 at 9:10am ADT wrote:
Sea food
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On 17 May 2012 at 9:31am teacher wrote:
I love seafood ADT but I am sure its pronounced Seaford. I also love Bread and Ham.
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On 17 May 2012 at 10:32am The Twister wrote:
Who cares....
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On 17 May 2012 at 10:36am Sashimi wrote:
we used to live in Herstmonceux (hirst-man-zoo). Most people in Hailsham could say it. In Eastbourne and Lewes, it was about half and half. By the time you got to Brighton, no one could pronounce it without mangling their vowels and sounding like Lloyd Grossman as they tried to do it in French. While we lived there, a very talented gastronomic family went through to the final of Masterchef three times and it was a delight to hear Lloyd Give his unique take on the village name on each show where they appeared.
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On 17 May 2012 at 10:51am teacher wrote:
Twister I believe its pronounced Hookares. Rather like Twister is pronounce prat.
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On 17 May 2012 at 12:51pm Mercian wrote:
"only heard Off-ham since the 80s when the DFLS came down to this remote part of Sussex!!!! "
Judging by the fact that Lewesians born before the 1980s sound distinctly estuarine (rather than an old school Sussex accent) then I think the London influence had arrived well before then!!!
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On 17 May 2012 at 1:41pm Cliffite wrote:
The local way to pronounce Brighton is with an "oi" so it becomes Broighton.
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On 17 May 2012 at 1:47pm Mr Forks wrote:
Oaf-um as in dick-head
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On 17 May 2012 at 5:26pm Annette Curtin-Twitcher wrote:
I thought Brighton was pronounced Be-Right-On these days.

My OH refuses to accept that it's ArdingLIE and ChiddingLIE and mispronounces them both to annoy me. I think he gets Oafam right though.
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On 17 May 2012 at 8:56pm Lewes wrote:
Offham (Oafam)
Malling (Mawling)
Seaford (Seafud)
Burwash (Burish)
Ardingly (Arding-lie)
You can still hear bits of the old Sussex accent in the older generation but it's mostly gone now. I've got some recordings of my grandparents speaking and parts of it need a translator!
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On 17 May 2012 at 11:39pm Bling Mare wrote:
In Seaford, they pronounce it SEA-FORD, not Seafud.
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On 18 May 2012 at 12:11am IMEYOU wrote:
In Lewes (loo-is) or a DFL pronunciation loooos, Seaford is usually pronounced as "SeeFud" as is London is pronounced as "Lundun"
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On 18 May 2012 at 12:14am IMEYOU wrote:
Also in Lewes, Offam is pronounced as Oh-Fum
 
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On 18 May 2012 at 12:19am IMEYOU wrote:
"LEWES" Malling (Mawling)
Malling is pronounced as More-Ling
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On 18 May 2012 at 12:24am IMEYOU wrote:
I stand to be corrected by Lewesians only !
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On 18 May 2012 at 6:28am Clifford wrote:
Chuck wrote: 'When in Rome, do as the Romans do, and that includes pronounciation.'

And also spell as the Romans - it's proNUNciation, not ptoNOUNciation.
 
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On 18 May 2012 at 9:34am Dave wrote:
Since were being pedantic he didn't say ptoNOUNciation
 
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On 18 May 2012 at 9:57am Southover Queen wrote:
I'm pretty sure that the Romans wouldn't have even attempted to spell pronunciation, with or without a stray 't'.

Since we're being pedantic, obviously.
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On 18 May 2012 at 9:59am Clifford wrote:
I know Dave - it's one of nature's laws that if you try to correct someone else you always make a mistake yourself. (As you'll see you did too - we're, not were).
 
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On 18 May 2012 at 10:00am Clifford wrote:
Southover Queen - in this context we are the Romans.
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On 18 May 2012 at 10:48am brixtonbelle wrote:
how is cuilfail pronounced ?
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On 18 May 2012 at 11:27am Harry wrote:
My roots are in Eastbourne and Seaford was mostly pronounced Sea-fud by people there.
 
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On 18 May 2012 at 1:27pm Southover Queen wrote:
Very good question, BB, and one I am anxious to have an answer to.
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On 18 May 2012 at 1:53pm Pete wrote:
Is it like - quill fail ? What's the name's origin ?
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On 18 May 2012 at 2:31pm Southover Queen wrote:
It looks celtic in origin - Welsh, for instance. However some light googling suggests that the hillside was owned by a solicitor who named it after a Scottish castle and that it's pronounced "quill fail' (although I think my version is more like "coo-ill fail", somewhat idiosyncratically)
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On 18 May 2012 at 3:15pm Helpful Henry wrote:
It's Queue fail of course.
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On 18 May 2012 at 11:13pm Harold wrote:
Q-fale ....Simples
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On 19 May 2012 at 12:34am king cnut wrote:
keel-fail or kill-fail


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