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Heroin in Lewes

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On 9 Jun 2011 at 10:58am MC wrote:
Walking from the Station car park up Station Street at 9am this morning I surprised a group of three pony-tailed men opposite the Landsdowne. As I came across them they immediately split up, quickly walking in different directions. One looked directly at me, a small thin man with a startlingly aged face and haunted look in his eyes. He was holding a syringe and appeared to have been given something by one of the younger pony-tailed men.

Although I've seen this sort of thing in Brighton a few times I was surprised to see it so visible in Lewes. Is heroin an acknowledged issue here?
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 11:40am Lambo wrote:
MC - Lewes in the 90s/00s was awash with heroin. I knew at least five people who died from overdoses and lots more who were addicted. All local lads from various backgrounds. I hoped the situation had improved, but from your observation it appears not. Dreadful business...

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On 9 Jun 2011 at 1:50pm giveitarest wrote:
Maybe it's a special new kind of heroin which specifically targets men with ponytails? Excellent idea.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 2:49pm Madam Bovary wrote:
Can we include men who wear hats and sunglasses indoors?
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 4:13pm bastian wrote:
there has always been an issue here, like lambo i remember lots of oyungsters who died of smack od in the 90's, two in one family it was rough.Does shock the bones though,I'm sorry you had to witness that but it is part of this town and has been for a long time...sweet old bexhil is far worse and worthing used to be really bad.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 4:56pm Toot wrote:
Every town in the country has its smackheads. Lewes certainly doesn't have any more of a problem than other towns in England. Heroin is a plague of the western world, not just Lewes.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 5:06pm Local wrote:
The old bill nicked one of those junkies in Pinwell lane toilets this morning.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 5:10pm Lambo wrote:
Hopefully not now Toot but it certainly was a huge problem in Lewes.
I pity the pony-tail brigade mentioned earlier, but before you know it they'll be passing the stuff onto your sons and daughters. I know for a fact that is how it happened for some of the people I knew.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 6:54pm Paul Newman wrote:
I am aware of the problem Lambo , and to me it does seem that Lewes suffers more than you might expect. Is it the proximity of Brighton do you think?
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 7:14pm Madamr Bovary wrote:
What really ought to be stopped are the dealers waiting to sell to kids on their way home from school.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 7:16pm Lambo wrote:
My last post didn't make it through...
Possibly Paul. However, I remember a number of very unsavoury characters arriving in Lewes in the mid 90s. From Scotland as it happens. They brought the heroin 'culture' with them and introduced the stuff to local youngsters. One of whom was my 14 year old neighbour. They were responsible for some horrific crimes, which I don't believe they ever paid for. Once the drugs were on the streets, there was a domino effect and loads of young people became addicted - nobody seemed to listen or see what was happening. It caused carnage amongst families. MC's description reminded me of one of those awful people - I hope to God it's not him, although I can't believe he'd still be alive.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 7:19pm Lambo wrote:
Madame B. Exactly, please, please tell the local police to do something about it before it all happens again.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 7:42pm MC wrote:
If the small pony-tailed guy with the boy shaped body and old face is one of the horrible people you describe Lambo he's paying for his sins now.

As I walked up the street a police car pulled up next to me at the lights and I reported the affair. An hour or two later the police rang back and said they'd picked up the one I'd thought was the dealer and found controlled substances on him.
 
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 7:55pm Davina wrote:
I used to live in a flat opposite two notorious brothers, who were both heroin addicts. Their electricity was cut off so often, they used to shoot up in the hallway. One of them is dead now (OD) but not sure what happened to the other.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 8:31pm bastian wrote:
Lambo, do you remember what the dealers used to do to the people who owed money,you still see the survivors around today with nasty scars up the sides of their mouths..not many survived...it's not just about smack, it's about the knives and nasty beatings that go with it.That really is something we need to protect our kids against...so no more of this commonly excepted thinking that it's just part of teenage behavior..it doesn't have to be and I have personally seen the sh*tty end of what happens to teenagers who get involved with the stuff,(not my own i'm glad to say,perhaps they have seen enough to put them off.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 10:22pm Madame Bovary wrote:
I get the impression that the police trawl this forum on a regular basis, and I am glad that they will see the passionate and informed response on this thread. Perhaps it will inspire them into a new initiative.
What I can't understand is that we have been educating children about the misuse of drugs for more than a generation, and yet the problem gets worse. Those who boast of their use of "recreational" drugs aren't helping. There is plenty of evidence that these can lead on to much stronger and more deadly substances, yet the natural arrogance of youth will always maintain that they can "handle" it. One problem is peer group pressure; another is a lack of cohesion, love and authority within many families. Unfortunately it is natural for the adolescent to rebel against the dictats of their parents, and that is all part of the process of growing up. Drug use, however, is not a safe playground in which to grow up. Hope this makes sense; perhaps someone else can say it better.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 10:46pm MC wrote:
Today's incident caused me some thought. One strand was about police on the street. For various reasons I'd not have reported the incident if a panda car had not stopped right beside me. It's very unusual to see Police on the street.
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 11:18pm Lambo wrote:
Again, my post did not get through...
A condensed version -
Davina - i know who you are talking about; I also know the other brother has spent along time inside.
Bastian - I do indeed remember what happened to those who crossed the line. One lad was disemboweled in the carpark down from the Pine Chest, another's head was picked up from the A27 by-pass after apparently hanging himself from a long rope off the arched bridge. I don't think he would have done that voluntarily.
The scottish person mentioned before, sold my friend bad junk, watched him die and then robbed the corpse of his wallet and watch.
Makes me sick thinking of it all.
Don't let the cycle come round again - R.I.P to the souls of the forgotten departed xx
 
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On 9 Jun 2011 at 11:32pm jrsussex wrote:
MC - Out of interest ask the police officer that contacted you to let you know he had got the dealer what the punishment was? Ther lies the key. In Hastings in 2008 two class A dealers were given penalty notices of £60 each, which they probably earn in less than an hour of actual dealing. The Sussex police said they were following Home Office guidelines.
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 5:56am MC wrote:
I will. I have his details. He was a Hastings officer, strangely enough, on his way to pick up a bullet proof vest from ES. Nice guy, sporting a chunky crucifix medallion.
The stories above are horrific and entirely at odds with my impression of Lewes. They seem more suited to an inner city sink estate.
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 8:27am bastian wrote:
sorry to burst your bubble mc
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 8:35am Julia Squeezer wrote:
This site was passed to me by a friend who is a respected medical journalist. The images are heart-breaking but might help to warn people.

Check it out here »
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 8:37am Julia Squeezer wrote:
Bother, the link didn't attach to my message. Here it is: h++p://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthpicturegalleries/8345461/From-Drugs-to-Mugs-Shocking-before-and-after-images-show-the-cost-of-drug-addiction.html.

Check it out here »
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 8:55am Chav wrote:
****** grown a ponytail has he?
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 8:59am ITK wrote:
Davina, I knew the brothers who you talk about very well...especially when they were younger. the older one i believe now lives in Scotland and is clean as far as i know. Damn shame, 2 good looking lads.
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 9:02am ITK wrote:
That'll be ****** then Chav ?
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 9:38am Treeson wrote:
wasn't one of the more well known [ex?] users selling Xmas Trees last season? Better kind of X I guess
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 10:06am Republican wrote:
You quite often see what I'll refer to (in a Daily Mailish moment) as junkie types on that corner. As it happens its in between the doctors surgery and the chemist. I have a feeling that the chemist fills methadone prescriptions which might account for both the location and the timing.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 12:30pm Clifford wrote:
I've noticed publicans rarely shoot other publicans or decapitate their customers. That's probably because alcohol is a legal drug so criminals are (rarely) involved in its distribution. When the Americans banned it in the 1920s, surprise-surprise, distribution became a criminal activity and gang violence soared.
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 12:55pm Jon wrote:
Yes Wybournes chemist does fill methadone prescriptions, as does Boots. They also supply sugar free methadone at ten times the cost to the taxpayer, and quite often will be asked for needles at the same time as dispencing the methadone, even though the junkies are supposed to be clean to get the prescription in the first place. Unfortunately, due to patient confidentiality, neither the Dispensers or Pharmacists are allowed to report this.
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 3:40pm bastian wrote:
you will also find the spoons and discarded meth bottles(no name on the label) all over town.Let's face it it is as wide spread as the papers say but it's underground most of the time,you don't generally see it,except when you are unfortunate enough to pass it in the street as MC did this week.I just hope it doesn't take off like it did before dragging in younge teenagers,some still at school.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 3:57pm jrsussex wrote:
The argument of alcohol being harmful clearly stands up but there is a difference between the consumption of alcohol and the use of drugs. Alcohol almost always in causing health problems, including death, is caused by the abuse of the product. Drugs can kill with one pill or an over-dose. presumably even regular drug users do not, in the main, over-dose purposely. Alcohol, unless drunk stupidly, is more of a long term health hazard, whereas drugs can kill on the very first occasion you use them.
A 15 year old girl died just this week from inhaling a substance not meant for that purpose but obviously she was hooked on it. A tragic end to such a very young life, it genuinely saddens me. In my opinion no one should defend the use of drugs, which as I am realistic I am very aware is not the view of everybody.
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 3:58pm jrsussex wrote:
The argument of alcohol being harmful clearly stands up but there is a difference between the consumption of alcohol and the use of drugs. Alcohol almost always in causing health problems, including death, is caused by the abuse of the product. Drugs can kill with one pill or an over-dose. presumably even regular drug users do not, in the main, over-dose purposely. Alcohol, unless drunk stupidly, is more of a long term health hazard, whereas drugs can kill on the very first occasion you use them.
A 15 year old girl died just this week from inhaling a substance not meant for that purpose but obviously she was hooked on it. A tragic end to such a very young life, it genuinely saddens me. In my opinion no one should defend the use of drugs, which as I am realistic I am very aware is not the view of everybody.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 3:58pm jrsussex wrote:
Apologies, it appeared not to post first time.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 3:59pm Naive? wrote:
I don't know where I was when all this was happening in the 90's. I am normally very aware of what is going on around me. Was it really as obvious as is being portrayed here?
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 4:51pm Lambo wrote:
Naive - if you were a regular on the Lewes pub circuit you would have known all usual suspects. Drugs, violence (glassings plus previously mentioned atrocities) punch-ups, traveller wars; Friday nights were like the Wild West most weekends!
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 4:53pm Truth Teller wrote:
The drama queens are bigging this up somewhat, Phipsy and Bassett both died of overdoses, as did ******. Others were (are) on it (******) Scottish Steve was suppling to some as was Neil and J terry. Very small percentage out of a pop. of 16,000. Don't worry, this aint London. Mostly the toe rags that got involved anyway.
Stands back and waits....................?
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 5:18pm ITK wrote:
Truth teller, there is certainly a small proportion on or dealing H compared to the 16k in the town but i lived close to ****** several years ago and believe me, there was a steady procession of dodgy geezers in and out of his gaff.
Interesting that both ****** and ****** dads were old bill too lol
 
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 5:26pm Clifford wrote:
JR - I take your point, though I disagree with it because you can't say 'drugs' without specifying which drugs. As a man of the 60s yourself (I think) you may, like me, have occasionally indulged in, for example, marijuana or acid. I've not heard of anyone dying from 'one pill or an overdose' as far as these substances are concerned. It's that old story, if you lie to the kids about one thing and they find you're wrong on that then they won't believe you about anything else.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 5:41pm Lambo wrote:
Blimey TT - tell it as it was.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 6:46pm bastian wrote:
I would rather people were honest with their kids,and believe me this hasn't been bigged up,tell that to the famillies who remember their loved ones,Danny and craig biggs died within a few years of each other..it was tragic.It may suprise some that in a town of 16 thousand the impact can be huge.When the said disembowling occurred it was reported in the paper as "an incident"...very subtle.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 6:53pm jrsussex wrote:
Clifford - I consider myself lucky, albeit two people were dead, in that when I was 19 (in the 50's) I was at a party where a boy and a girl went upstairs and took heroin, Both were found dead some hours later. That put me of any form of drugs throughout my life. As surprising as it may be I have never taken or used drugs of any kind, even more surprising when you take into account that I operated nightclubs and pubs for 30 years and witnessed an awful lot of drug abuse. During that time quite a few people died from drug use, some suicide, others over-doses, so you will understand my hard line against drugs. Whilst I am street wise enough to recognise that many, many people use, or have in the past, soft drugs and come out of it OK that does not remove the fact that the vast majority of those who finish up on hard drugs began their habit on soft drugs.
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 7:08pm Lambo wrote:
Bastian - was there a memorial service for Danny at the Grange Gardens? I think his father organised it. I went with a friend who was upset.
TT - John Law was alright - he got mixed up with the wrong crowd.
There was a certain I.E Phipps in court today in Scotland...
JR - I agree. After witnessing the Lewes drugs carnage, I can't believe there are calls to legalise it all. I wonder what the families of the deceased would say about it?
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On 10 Jun 2011 at 9:02pm Almost ex-drug user wrote:
I'm 50 and to varying degrees used drugs all my life (well, since I was 14 anyway). Not that much in the last 12 years but still buy some pot now and again and tried out those legal drugs like Methylone and Methedrine (now illegal).
Many of my life-long friends have had similar life styles. Amonst my large gropup of associates (and their associates) I Have been aware of two deathsfrom heroin and one suicide from speed, and a psychiatric case from too much acid. Only the last was a friend. I've also had three friends die in motorcycle acidents (no drugs!) and two friends and a relation die due to alcohol (and one fall off a mountain). I've never, ever heard of anyone dying the first time they took a drug. The majority of the 50 year old friends of mine who took drugs recreationally would still toke on a joint if passed one in the right circumstances (or probably a pipe now as no-one seems to be able to stomach tobacco). Most people also had a lot of fun taking drugs. E at raves being a fave, but also pot with music, acid and mushrooms in the countryside and speed and coke at parties. Only in late teenage years did drugs dominate the lifestyle, with music and parties and wild socialising being the order of the day. All these people now lead varied lives, philosophy professor, lawyer, business man, jeweller, house wife, doctor's recptionsist, video producer, gardener, programmer, musician, furniture designer, locksmith, marketing consultant, politician, builder to name only the first ones that come to mind... the majority with families and successfully raising kids.

My point is that I think for every messed up junkie there are thousands of casual users who enjoy drugs and then grow out of them. As drugs are illegal they don't shout about it (unlike me).

Much of the problems with drugs are as a direct result of their illegality. Much of the associated crime would not exist if they were legal and importantly, rebellious teenagers would be much less attracted to them. In fact I am convinced that they would become less attractive to most people who might otherwise choose to take them.
If people want drugs they'll find them. As things stand at the moment they also find the underworld.

Alcohol is just another drug. Addictive, physically harmful. The main difference between alcohol and most other drugs (apart from ithe obvious legal status) is that it makes users aggressive and insensitive, turning town centres into no-go areas after 10pm for the majority of "normal" people (those that go to the Friday Market?). Can you imagine turning out time for a pot or opium house? You'd either be mildly irritated by childish giggling or just hear the odd slow whisper. You'd certainly not feel threatened or be beaten up.


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