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Fishing in Lewes.

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On 12 Jun 2009 at 4:31pm Fishing Fred wrote:
Hi, I used to fish the pells as a yound lad but soon moved on to swanborough lakes, i then took a step back from fishing due to work commitments.
I recently started fishing again and have fished swanborough a couple of times only to return home incredibly disappointed with the fishing standards down there.
I am wondering if anyone knows of any other fishing lakes in the Lewes area close and not club owned.
Thank you.
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On 12 Jun 2009 at 5:32pm Long Distance Whelker wrote:
Modern father (with son) was fishing in the reed beds on the railway land during half term. From what he proudly showed me, he caught a hell of a lot in those reed beds (although they are probably barren now as he was not throwing the fish back)!
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 2:09am harold wrote:
to start ... whty was anyone fishing on railwayland during halfterm .... it is closed season untill the 15thof june and lewes district follow that rule, I am surprised you did not catch at swanbough but it is a bad start to the season everywhere, the water temps are down and the fish are not feeding, give it another try once we have had some more warmth, ( iv heard paste works well there),
there is alot of fish moving in the pells in the eves, try floating crust, corn, pellet, paste and magot is a good standby for the good roach....

ps remember your licence and you need a premit to fish the pells, get those from the town hall( take licence with you)
tight lines all
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 7:47am MC wrote:
...and why was he not throwing the fish back??? Sounds like modern dad needs a bit of a talking to.
So we can start fishng rivers on Monday... and not Tuesday as I had thought?
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 9:05am FA wrote:
The close season is from march 15th to june 15th INCLUSIVE....ie you can fish on the 14th march but not the 15th and you can fish on 16th june but not 15th.....so therefore the season starts this TUESDAY.
There's a lot of local fisheries around but most require a drive of up to 30 minutes. Tanyards, Passies, Framfield to name a few bigger ones plus lots of small ponds. Try googling it !
Agree with above about Swanborough....i find it hard NOT to catch there and once you've waded through the skimmers and roach, there's some decent tench, perch, chub and eels in there.
As for the pells...try float fished cockles for the carp in there...awesome stuff on light (ish) tackle
Tight lines
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 3:56pm Fishing Fred wrote:
Not saying i didnt catch anything at swanborough but found it impossible to catch on meat and corn, and all i could get was mini roach and perch even after persisting at it for a few hours there was no improvement of the fish where as it used to be you would get these but then bigger roach would move to the area! Worst thing about most lakes around lewes is that they are club owned and you have to be a member which isnt worth the money.
As well as that the smaller lakes dont advertise or appear on google
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 5:52pm FA wrote:
Can't see how it's not worth the money to join a club !!! Seaford angling has some pretty decent local waters for around £50 a year. If you fish Swanborough 2 or 3 times a year, you're nearly there with your yearly subs....and you can fish their waters as often as you like. Im a member of Hassocks AC and again they have some decent waters not too far out of Lewes.
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 5:53pm MC wrote:
I'm not certain I can agree about clubs not being worth the money. I guess it probably depends upon how often you go fishing. I think the clubs I belong to are very well worth the money (Sussex Piscatorial Society, Ouse Angling Preservation Society, Royal Tunbridge Wells Angling Society). Judging by your liking of "commercials" maybe you ought to take a look at Isfield Angling club. Percy (of Percy's Tackle shop in Lewes) is on the committee so go there and he'll fill you in. They have a fair few of waters containing fish like carp and bream.
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 5:55pm MC wrote:
oohh... synchronicity.
Aaah.. back to catfish caught on the Ouse... I've failed to find anyone who will own up to catching or seeing it. Maybe it was a Hassocks member?
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 7:04pm FA wrote:
There's some serious carp on the Ouse....opposite tesco is a good place but never seen a catfish. Been a few mullet up by Willeys bridge but i've not been able to catch one in 35 years of trying !!!!!
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 7:38pm MC wrote:
I have just been watching what I'm almost sure were a shoal of 14 (or so) mullet in the trout pool at the mills... either that or they were bream, but I don't think they were.
Carp... all over the Ouse now unfortunately.
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 9:22pm an OAPS wrote:
@MC. Mullet all the way up to the Mills would be unusual - I don't recall ever seeing any that far up. However, we often get a small run of Shad up as far as Barcombe Mills and they usually appear in the pool where the water runs in, perhaps that's what they were.
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On 13 Jun 2009 at 11:26pm happy wrote:
english channel... fire on the beach, mackerel, sunset, no license needed, ... all the rest is nonsense...
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 2:00am Long Distance Whelker wrote:
Mullet - try fishing from the railway land at the Winterbourne outlet. I always see loads of mullet there and have seen many being caught
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 11:13am seafisher wrote:
If you cant eat it..what is the point?
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 11:37am FA wrote:
Here we go....single minded tw@ts who don't believe there's other things out there that people enjoy. Maybe some of the people who go coarse fishing don't like eating fish.
Countryside
wildlife
fresh air
man verses beast
There's a few "points" to get you started.
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 11:42am Hedwig wrote:
errm..I think thats a bit harsh. He/she only asked a simple question, he wasn't being nasty. Why are you being so aggressive? No need to call someone a tw*t. I for one don't see the point in fishing either (although my other half loves it) but I wouldn't expect someone to call me "close-minded" or a tw*t.
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 12:11pm MC wrote:
You may as well ask what 's the point of golf.
Back to mullet. I was watching a sea trout trying to get out of the trout pool with an OAPS bailiff (Perry) last week. Before he clearly identified the fish as a trout he was wondering if it might have been a mullet.... I asked him about it as I was amazed he thought mullet came so far up the river... but he was adamant that they did.
I've just looked up some photos of greay mullet and I'm now 95% certain they were mullet. There were about 14 of them and they were roughly 14 inches long... I'd be very surprised if there were 14 bream of that size resident in the pool.... and I'd probably have seen them before now too.
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 12:23pm MC wrote:
Oh, and they were in front the main weir, i.e. the opposite side of the pool too the main inlet.
Definitely not shad. Far too big.
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 1:37pm happy wrote:
Have tried to catch mullet for dinner at winterbourne outlet. Notoriously hard to get a bite though. LDW - am slightly sceptical - any idea on the bait? heard they go for a particular worm.

Course fishing - seems a bit pointless to me. enjoyable but pointless, just like golf.
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 1:48pm MC wrote:
Red worm I think (whatever they are, rag worm maybe?). I'd heard bread was supposed to be OK. Aren't they bottom feeders though?
Fishing for me is about being in beautiful places. It provides me with a gateway into the natural world.
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 2:15pm FA wrote:
Spot on MC....shame some people are so narrow minded.
Try peeler crabs or ragworm for Mullet. Bread flake as mentioned can also work. I see mullet scavenging in the margins for food by Willeys bridge at low tide and i know you can get ragworm and small crabs there under the rocks.
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 6:29pm harold wrote:
Mullet get very hard to catch the further up the river they come, spinners work with the hooks tipped with ragworm or even red wool !!!, as to the fish in the mills pool, there use to be a good head of big chub in there, a very simular looking fish to a mullet at distance, the mouth of the mullet is the giveaway if you can get close enough to see
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On 14 Jun 2009 at 11:21pm MC wrote:
If there were more than two chub of that size left anywhere near the pool since the organophosphate pollution incident of 2001 I'd have said that they could have been chub. However, is it normal for a shoal of fourteen or so 14+" chub to lay stock still 6 inches below the surface in still water, all pointing the same way?
BTW. I did have binoculars with me and could see that their mouths were noticeable for the full fleshy pink lips (the rest of the fish was quite dark). At one point I thought that they might have had barbles but I could not see clearly enough to be certain.
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On 15 Jun 2009 at 5:35pm Calm down wrote:
As someone mentioned above, FA seems very aggressive, why are you calling people narrow minded just because they don't share your fishing enthusiasm?
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On 15 Jun 2009 at 10:57pm Great Crested Newt wrote:
I agree Calm Down, FA is so bad tempered
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On 15 Jun 2009 at 11:19pm MC wrote:
It's 'cos it's the closed season. The rivers re-open tomorrow. I'm sure he'll be OK after that.
BTW. I have been told by one who should know that the fish were "definitely bream"
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On 16 Jun 2009 at 6:44pm Tim wrote:
Salmon and sea trout fishing has been legal from the 1st of May (there are sea trout in the ouse). There is no statute law that prevents course fish from being killed and eaten - however most angling clubs exclude this possibility in the UK.
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On 16 Jun 2009 at 9:10pm MVC wrote:
OAPS do not allow any fishing on their ticket above the Mills until July 16th now. I ate a pike I caught in the Ouse (not on OAPS waters), cooked up by the chef at the Anchor. Very muddy tasting it was too.
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On 16 Jun 2009 at 9:47pm an OAPS wrote:
Fishing above the Mills on OAPS is from today, 16th June.
And I too have eaten a small pike from the Ouse (35 years ago from Browns). Not pleasant.
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On 16 Jun 2009 at 10:12pm Tim wrote:
Whilst I do not want to encourage it - the pike needs to be put in a salt water solution for at least 10 hours first! Then it is delicious! Perch are much better. As for the sort of fish that most people go for such as carp - yuk!
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On 16 Jun 2009 at 10:25pm MC wrote:
Whoops. I meant June 16th (today).
Do you put it in salt water alive?
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On 16 Jun 2009 at 10:42pm I dont eat fish anymore wrote:
The pollution of our seas is at a peak with untreated sewage,pollution from heavy metals,( mercury,cadmium,lead,zinc,and sometimes plutonium,strontium etc) bacteria and viruses, parasites and worms.None of us would willingly swim in this mess, so why would we eat fish that have been exposed to it all of their lives?
Also,millions of dolphins,seals and other marine life are butchered every year by indescriminate large scale fishing,not to mention the fish themselves.
This is taken form a book from 1989.Now whether things have changed in the last 20 years..I don't know.And I suppose this doesn't cover the fish in our rivers...? But I don't eat fish also because I am dubious of the way they are killed.
Whether you throw them back or not,fish are caught on a barbed hook?
You throw them back or you don't,up to you.
But whatever,a fish is caught on a hook,great stress is caused by this surely...
And I am tired of hearing..."Fish don't feel it." I disagree.
I think all fishing is barbaric.And I am not a wierdo....
I also disagree with the killing of lobsters,crabs,whelks,winkles,cockles,mussels...Eels,(which I have seen killed in France,alive,heads chopped off) Oysters...Scallops.
Anyone agree? I somehow doubt it.....
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On 17 Jun 2009 at 2:28pm FA wrote:
Christ that's all we need....swampy on the forum !!!!!!!
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On 17 Jun 2009 at 3:57pm MC wrote:
If you're worried about pollution you'd better stop eating plants and animals too (not that it will help you or anyone else of course). The amount of chemicals sprayed on your average grain plant is pretty worrying.
How can you be sure that fish feel pain but plants do not? Can you even be sure you know what pain is. The experience of pain is entirely subjective. Do you know what being a fish is like?
As for barbaric. What is a pike killing a roach, a cat torturing a mouse, larfge scale and battery farming, world politics (real politik), capitalism etc
I have a horrible feeling that you might be a child. If you are, I'm sorry for being abrupt.

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On 17 Jun 2009 at 6:29pm 40 something wrote:
Can anyone tell me why we still chuck crabs and lobsters in boiling water to cook them? I know it's because 'It tastes better'. We don't (thank God, and wouldn't be allowed to by law,) chuck a pig or cow into boiling water just to 'tenderise the meat' so surely it should be the same for all animals, no matter how insignificant they are. It's really horrible. I'm sure it dosn't taste that different if they were bonked on the head first then shoved in the hot pot!
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On 17 Jun 2009 at 6:34pm IDEFA... wrote:
Fair point MC.(No,I'm not a child either)
Your point about cats killing mice etc,that is nature though isn't it?
Large scale battery farming concerns me very much and that is why I stopped eating cheap meat.I only eat meat when I know where it came from,and as it costs more money I don't eat it much.
As for world politics,Yes,there is a lot going on that I do not agree with and can't do much about.Whereas I am in charge of my body and what I decide to feed it on.
Interesting comments though.
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On 17 Jun 2009 at 6:44pm Great Crested Newt wrote:
Cats killing mice isn't nature as they are not indigenous in the UK and they kill for fun, not to eat and the only reason the little f...ers dont eat them is because they get kitty food at home, now in fancy sachets. If they were starving, they would eat to kill but they are wiping out wild birds like there's no tomorrow and the sooner they are exterminated, the better. B...ard things, if I catch one cr..ing in my garden, i'll lob a brick at it. Flea infested vermin.
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On 18 Jun 2009 at 9:55am IDEFA wrote:
40 something,I thought I was alone in my hatred for the way shellfish are cooked...I have bought this subject up before on here and someone said that when you cook mussels,if any of the shells are open beforehand you should ditch it,cos it's dead.That means mussels are alive when they are boiled? I saw a cook on the telly killing a crab with a skewer with the words "Don't worry,they don't feel a thing..."
How do they know? How do they know when you take your crab/lobster out of the freezer prior to cooking,that they are 'asleep?'
I know they are 'only' shellfish, but I think it is awful the way scallops and oysters are eaten,and prepared.
I have never eaten lobster but know I would love it,same with scallops.
I now can't eat fish at all which is a shame as it is apparently so good for us.

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On 18 Jun 2009 at 10:12am FA wrote:
IDEFA.....not having a pop (for once !!!) but one thing that was said about fish not feeling pain was.....if you put a hook through a human's lip and pull, the natural reaction would be to move with the pull to prevent more pain.
If this was the case, why do fish pull against the pull and surely risk more pain ? I don't know the answer. Maybe fish think it's better to have a bit of pain then to be killed ? maybe the fish don't feel any pain at all ? Only fish have the answer.
With shellfish such as mussells, don't forget that they don't have a brain or a central nervous system so only have the absolute basic functions. Again we don't know, but i very much doubt whether any shellfish would feel any pain by being boiled up.
 
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On 18 Jun 2009 at 10:57am IDEFA wrote:
Thanks for that FA....I didn't know mussels were brainless.Does that also apply to scallops,oysters and prawns? I just had the idea of them being boiled alive.
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On 18 Jun 2009 at 11:19am FA wrote:
Most basic forms of invertabrate such as scallops, oysters and mussels don't have brains etc Same as anemones and coral. Im sure crustaceans such as shrimps and crabs do but it's very basic.
That said, i've kept most of these things for many years in a tropical marine reef aquarium and even the most basic forms of life are very reactive to touch, temperature and certain other water conditions so there must be something there. I've kept tropical sea anemones that get up and walk around the tank until they find a place they like (they are attached by this giant "foot") and some clams are extremely reactive to light.....if you run your hand over the aquarium lights to create a shadow, the clams "clam up" (sorry !!!) immediately, so again, there must be some kind of feeling/sense etc
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On 18 Jun 2009 at 12:01pm IDEFA wrote:
My son has a tropical fish tank with lots of fish and 3 little lobsters.
When I visit and stay over and can't sleep I will often just watch them digging around and climbing about and find them fascinating to watch...They seem to 'wake up' at night.Strange really as there is a light on all the time in the tank and they don't know day from night?
The mum had babies and there were literally hundreds of teeny lobsters of which only 3 survived.The mum then ate the Dad and it was decided to put her in a seperate tank as she was also eating her babies.
The 3 in the tank now are the only survivors....And they will probably breed too.I can now no longer eat longoustines.Which has stretched now to prawns.
Which is probably daft...as I love fish and seafood.




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