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Care Homes in Lewes

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On 11 Feb 2013 at 10:06pm Ozzy wrote:
Does anyone have any recent feedback or experiences of care homes in Lewes, particularly Claydon House. Anyone worked there or have any experiences of people staying there and what it was like?
Many thanks
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On 11 Feb 2013 at 10:19pm the old mayor wrote:
You making a documentary ?
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On 11 Feb 2013 at 10:31pm Blah Blah Blah wrote:
Your not a papal representative are you?
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On 11 Feb 2013 at 10:44pm Ozzy wrote:
No not making a documentary just researching for a family member.
Blah Blah Blah - Its not my Great Uncle Ben who needs a place in the twilight of his life
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On 11 Feb 2013 at 10:56pm Blah Blah Blah wrote:
Oh that's a shame, Mumford and Sons and Benny all in one week.
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On 12 Feb 2013 at 12:12am Extra wrote:
Social Services will provide a list of care homes in the area for you to inspect.
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On 12 Feb 2013 at 9:41am Spartacus wrote:
My dad spent a week at Claydon House about 3 years ago and I can only comment on the dementia wing. The new wing was nice, clean and airy while the staff were great except one who lacked any aspect of basic nursing/caring ability.
The major problem was the management, which was non-existant at the time. You could see it in the faces of the staff, even though they were all professional enough not to comment, that they were being given no support by any level of management.
Things might of changed, I hope they have but I've heard mixed reports about it since. It should be great and options are very thin on the ground. If you go for a look round make sure that there is an on site manager (not one covering a couple of homes) and talk directly to the staff and other patients relatives. The Quality Care Commission reports can be missleading, you'll get a much better feel looking staff, patients and relatives directly in the eyes.
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On 12 Feb 2013 at 10:41am Woody wrote:
I posted a similar question before Christmas and have been intending to comment again since.
My mother spent 4 days in Claydon House due to an emergency. When we came to get her out, she was in obvious distress. She had not been washed, she was in a dishevelled state, had scratches on her arms and was wearing the same clothes which she had arrived in. Her bag contained other peoples clothing including wet underwear. There was also half eaten food stuffed at the bottom. The place is a disgrace. Complaints have been made.
As for management, it doesn't exist. When I asked who was in charge and what the procedure is in case of a fire, noone could tell me. A couple of staff members were trying their best, but others were in no way up to the job. A couple had obvious learning difficulties.
Avoid at all costs, and at £850 per week it is a very high cost to pay indeed; emotionally, physically and financially.
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On 13 Feb 2013 at 12:44pm Amanda wrote:
I too had a very bad experience with my mum staying at Claydon a few years ago - thankfully she was only supposed to be there a short time - but even so I had to pull her out on 4th day, but from day one had major concerns. I can't go into the details, but basically very poor care - and worse! I believe it was down to poor management and lack of permanent/enough staff. The complaints procedure with social services was a joke - no one from Claydon or Care Quality Commission even bothered to show up. Don't rely on the CQC reports on website as when I was looking for a place for my mum, they were out of date or misleading or both. You have to go on personal recommendation only. The dementia provision in and around Lewes is woefully in adequate and support for carers practically non-existent. My mum is in a home in Hailsham, although I would have preferred somewhere nearer to me but not possible. I hear a new home with dementia provision will be built in Ringmer in future. Good luck with your search, you're going to need it I'm afraid.
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On 13 Feb 2013 at 6:53pm Rene wrote:
Goodness glad i looked in.My dad who is a born and bred lewesian is in a carehome due to a nasty fall.He is right down in Bexhill and i have been there on numerous occassions and it always looks good to me.My dad is begging me to get him back tolewes and i have mentioned to the social worker he wishes this aswell,but now i am really put off.At the moment due to his other disabilty he gets volunteer vistors he gets taken out in the car to a special club and the staff are lovely.So maybe it wouldn't be a wise thing to do to get him moved to Claydon House if thats what it is like.
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On 13 Feb 2013 at 11:56pm Woody wrote:
Rene - Avoid Claydon House. What goes on there is criminal and with all the coverage in the press recently of care horror stories, I really hope Lewes people will take notice. I'm surprised at the lack of comment to be honest. The population of Lewes is around 15K I believe, yet there is no decent provision for sufferers of dementia, which when I last looked at the stats, will be one in three of us at some stage.
My mother is now safe, in a wonderful care home in Seaford. The grief and feeling of loss, is tempered by the knowledge that she is cared for as a valued human being by caring, trained and approachable staff.
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On 14 Feb 2013 at 10:15am Amanda wrote:
Rene - try to find out why your Dad is so desperate to get out of that home, don't be taken in by appearances that all is well at the home, but listen to what your dad is saying and if you have any suspicions at all that he's not being treated well, get him out! I too was utterly shocked by the lack of decent, affordable provision of dementia care in and around Lewes, and the lack of joined up support for dementia suffers and their carers. I also can't quite believe this isn't one of top priorities of the area and also that Claydon seems to be carrying on in the same bad way as when it was when I pulled my mum out a couple of years ago. Unbelieveable that there are still horror stories about it - it made my blood boil when I saw them promoting themselves and their `dementia cafe' sessions in Viva Lewes last summer! I wanted to go and make a scene, I didn't of course believing that probably things had changed, i.e got rid of previous management and addressed staffing issues. Criminal is the right word for all the powers that be for allowing it to continue. Filsham Lodge in Hailsham has very good staff, although physical environment could be better, but I'd rather have my mum with people who I can trust than in some posh building with staff that clearly don't give a **** and protected by a system that also clearly doesn't give a **** otherwise they'd do something about it. Best of luck to anyone out there trying to navigate the social care system ...
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On 14 Feb 2013 at 11:08am Rene wrote:
Thanks Guys.I know a lady who worked there a few years back messaged her last night she said it was by far the worse care home she knows also she damaged her back forever were her words while working there and her last words were they should bomb the site.This is so scarey and about why my dad is desperate i thinks he is confused and just wants to get back to Lewes and the situation is very sad.I will take a good look at him whne i go down next and ask him more questions.Worried about that place now.Have phoned this morning and he is not well at all and they are getting doctor out.The manager seems like someone i can trust,and she is very reassuring,but you never know and i would not want the knowledge that i had left my poor dad down there being unhappy for a reason.
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On 14 Feb 2013 at 11:34am Amanda wrote:
Rene, just to be clear I'm not saying the reason why your dad is upset is probably cos he's being mistreated, just saying be careful about taking things at face-value, double-check what you're being told by providers, and above all believe what your relatives are telling you about their own experience. Keep an eye on developments of the new home to be built in Ringmer, which was referred to in last week's Sussex Express I think. I know it's a long way off, but it might be an option in the future if you're still not happy about your Dad in Bexhill. He's probably upset as you say about being so far from home and quite understandably, poor thing. And all this in the context that East Sussex CC are looking to make savings in their already poorly resourced social care budget - bloody disgraceful.
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On 14 Feb 2013 at 2:31pm Rene wrote:
Thanks Amanda.Its so sad really,and i know what you mean about keeping an eye,but its dificult to know what is true and what is not true with some elderly people when they are confused,but never the less i will be keeping a good eye on him.By the wa iagree with the East Sussex County Council saving money,but my dads social worke is a lovely lady and has put herself out for my dad,but at the end of the day she has someone above her who she has to answer to.
 
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On 23 Feb 2013 at 10:27am jane wrote:
You shouldn't always believe what you read .....
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On 23 Feb 2013 at 1:43pm Rene wrote:
Jane what are your pesonal views on this home? Have you or did you have a reletive in this home,are you somone who works there.I am not trying to be funny its hard when you have to ask question through these methods,but i need to know as much as i can about this home or any other in Lewes due to the fact there is a very good chance my dad will be moving into one onf them.
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On 25 Feb 2013 at 11:29am Amanda wrote:
No, you shouldn't believe what you read ... especially the very reliable (not) CQC reports on local care homes as I was advised to do by the `professionals' concerned, which are at best out-of-date (by years owing to something like 74% less checks being carried out by CQC in 2010/11 alone!) and not fit for purpose. So then you ask the professionals to make recommendations in lieu of up-to-date reliable info, but no they canâ??t do this as thereâ??s a conflict of interest! So you are advised to seek personal recommendation from friends + family, but if you don't know anyone who's gone through the system, you're a bit b*****ed, hence the rumour + conjecture. But heh that's what you get when you deregulate the market and let any Tom, Dick or Harry set up shop, monitored by a completely inadequate CQC and adult social care system operating on a shoe-string budget even in the good times (and things are going to get a whole lot worse in my view under the planned cuts to the budget supported by our Coalition representatives and demographic needs of an increasingly ageing population).
My agenda is simply to warn others - based on my own personal experience â?? and in lieu of any reliable system in place whereby others can access reliable info on local provision of residential homes for dementia suffers with any confidence. If my unsubstantiated comments result in preventing one family from going through what my mum and myself did, it'll be worth it. It makes my blood to hear of anyone apparently defending this system or the establishment concerned the way it still is. Viva Lewes Forum!
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On 27 Jun 2014 at 9:58am Bearoon wrote:
My mum was at Claydon House for three weeks last November and I can only speak highly of the place, the management and some of the team especially as I had researched and visited about thirty nursing homes before settling on Claydon House.
That’s not to say it was ‘the one’, but it was one of the best of four places for her due to her complex and deteriorating health needs at the time.
My original first choice had been another Nursing Home (which is from the same group of homes Claydon House belongs to) near Reading, Berkshire as that is where she lived and wanted to be however there was a waiting list and there had been no vacancies for weeks so I continued visiting others.
But despite seeing some twenty Nursing Homes in and around Reading I still had not found anything remotely suitable and as my mother’s health began to deteriorate (after she was moved from the intensive care of a stroke ward to a general ward where they care less) at the Royal Berks Hospital, I decided to start looking around Hove where I live for her health’s sake.
It was so incredibly refreshing to quickly find at least three further homes I was happy with in and around Brighton including Claydon.
Then I stumbled across all the horror about Claydon on the internet which some of you allude to which was at total odds with what I had seen and decided to tackle this head on with the now Manager of Claydon, Karen Grainger.
In short, the view my partner and I have is that Claydon had previously been a rotten apple but since Karen’s arrival, things had hugely improved though it was still work in progress.
The key decision we needed to make for my mother hinged on what nursing care my mother would get due to her rapidly failing health followed by an understanding of dementia of which she had Vascular Dementia compounded by the strokes to her language and communication areas meaning she could not make herself understood nor were we sure if she could understand us.
Karen is a also a experienced nurse and still remains very hands-on complimenting the rest of the nursing staff which was a real bonus. So much so, we confronted Karen about whether she was thinking of leaving seeing she had arrived to sort the place out and whether it was too much of a challenge after her frankness about the place.
we also asked her where she had worked previously so we could check the CQC reports of where she had previously worked (all good incidentally).
After moving my Mum there, we could clearly see she was being looked after far better than in hospital.
We dropped in up to twice daily initially before going every other day – always unannounced and at various times of the day. Her care plans were thorough and charts were all up to date (which can’t be said for her time on the ‘general’ ward at the Royal Berks).
The nurses were all good and two (Jennifer(?) was one can’t remember the name of the other) were exceptional in their empathy, care and communication.
I can commend a few of the Carers who worked with my mum for their amazing empathy and care.
During the time my Mum was there I learnt a lot of the ‘bad apples’ [staff – permanent, contract and temps] which ultimately make (or break) a great care home had either been sacked, moved on or not used again. As I understood it, one of the key problems had been carers recommending their own ‘mates’ for work there and that a number of agencies were used to make up shortfalls. It was that that led to all the damning reports and stories which made me shudder.
The morning my mum’s health took a sudden turn for the worse, the nurse persistently kept calling me and leaving me voicemails in the time I was away from my phone advising she had already called the Doctor; that I should come in to see my Mum and to call her back - she knew my mum was on her final journey. Again, so refreshing when the Royal Berks hadn’t even called me to say my Dad was on his journey - only after he had gone.
While I was there, all the staff I knew there kept popping in with support for the rest of the day until my Mum passed away.
On a wider note, I was incredibly privileged to be able to spend so much time from work looking around for a nursing home and also have an old friend (who once ran a nursing home and now ‘mystery shops’ residential and care homes in the North of England) to advise me what to look for and what awkward questions to ask.
In all, the whole process of deciding where to place a loved one is a minefield as everyone’s needs are different on so many levels.
My tips; avoid hearsay, CQC’s are useful, first hand recommendations is good place to start. Anything you research, whether positive or negative, remember to look at the date of when it was published – things change but ultimately nothing beats going in to as many homes as possible (both the good and bad), asking loads of questions, going back unannounced. You quickly learn what to look out for and ask.
Finally remember the place is for a loved one and not you
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On 22 May 2015 at 7:59pm Cam wrote:
I have spent 9 years supporting 2 of my relatives with dementia. Firstly at home with day support, then in residential homes, hospitals and live-in care. Rarely have I seen anything that is better than inhumane, scary, shameful, downright ignorant or abusive. It is common. One has to talk to other relatives, stay and help out, speak to care assistants to see below the surface. Part of the problem is the undervaluing of staff, they are often low paid, under trained, required to do so much paperwork it takes away from time with residents, no holiday nor sick pay, little or no support from management and then only persecution when it goes wrong. To do it well requires our society to value the work and we don't. We value selling and marketing most in our country. How much skill does that require! Dementia is complicated and challenging. Surely we should be training people in colleges to do this job, not just giving them a few days at best. This would also help weed out the ones who should not be let near a human being. There can also be cultural issues, e.g not speaking English or giving inappropriate food. I found a recent carer giving my mum with heart disease Bisto's thick gravy to drink. She thought that was what we did here, Another carer refused to encourage mum to eat or drink because she would 'only make a mess and I will have to clean it up, and I prefer stomach pegging'. Mum ended up with severe dehydration in hospital, almost dead. These care organisations have excellent CQC reports!. It is my experience that almost every horror story we are beginning to read is the norm. Anything else and you can be very very grateful. But check, really check. It's not obvious what is going on. I was at a conference for the NHS a while back, looking at setting up a dementia model for a certain part of the country, and I heard a doctor say to his mates 'if I get dementia I have told my kids to put me in a poor NHS home and deny me antibiotics'. We are not putting enough resources into dementia or older people's care. Those with dementia who are abused and I suspect this is very common won't be able to grow up and tell us what happened. Their story goes to the grave with them, and we can all pretend it's not happeneing. Because of the nature of carer training, employment and support at this point in time, I doubt any home escapes. Whether some are worse that others who only knows. That may depend on the other residents and the staff at that time. At my uncle's residential home there was a carer from a country that we would give benefits to. She spoke only a few words of English but her manner was so lovely the residents liked her, she was kind although clueless. One day she had a bad flu, not a cold. I told her she should be at home for hwr sake and the residents sake. She told me she couldn't go leave work because she could get no sick benefit snd she had a child to support and rent to pay. Within one month 3 residents on her ward were dead with pneumonia. This is called the old person's angel. My uncle was one who had a visit from the angel. I don't feel anger towards the carer, but I do towards the ignorance and greed and lack of care for the old that is creating this almighty mess. That home has an excellent CQC rating. What is really happening in these places is a taboo subject. The only suggestion I have is, if you can, pay for a young person who needs the money to go and sit with your relative as often as you can, and give the attention they will not get otherwise, and need. I employed a trainee paramedic to go and tell uncle about his days, hold his hand, take him out in the wheelchair, and tell me if he saw anything worrying. I visited very often too. It is now my opinion that we need to wake up to the dreadful state of dementia care, and plan for our futures, personally and as a society. But don't delude ourselves into thinking it will be fine. It is very scary unless you don't look.
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On 22 May 2015 at 9:27pm amy wrote:
I asked my doctor recently about care homes in Lewes for my mother should one be needed. His reply was that any home 'was only as good as me' - in other words I had to be the ears and eyes of protection.
My experience of care in the home has taught me the same. I have had to be vigilant not only with the care supplied by the carers - paid appallingly - but also with the ESCC who have tried to chop my mum's care package year on year; fighting this successfully has taken its toll over at least five years. it has made my life so much more difficult and caused extreme anxiety.I have had to remain vigilant and fight my mother's corner at every point.
In our society the weakest go to the wall; socially we have become increasingly brutal and degraded. Never ever believe that all is well - often the 'client' is too frightened to say.You must be aware of what is going on AT ALL TIMES.
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On 25 May 2015 at 8:07am amy wrote:
I think you should start a new thread on this issue Lucy. Readers on this forum tend only to read recent threads and this is too important to miss.
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On 14 Jul 2015 at 3:48pm Emma wrote:
I visited today and really liked the place, this worrys me ???? What home did you find in seaford as I found them all pretty horrible to be honest
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On 25 Jul 2015 at 5:52pm Andrew wrote:
Woody - can you tell us the name of the place in Seaford?


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