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CSBS bonfire prayer

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On 22 Oct 2012 at 9:48pm Sheriff John Stone wrote:
I notice that the last 2 verses of the bonfire prayer are missing from Commercial Square's programme. Is it because it might offend some people or is there another reason
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On 22 Oct 2012 at 10:19pm Tom Bowler wrote:
Nothing of the sort, an honest mistake, these things happen. It'll be there next year and every other year.
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On 22 Oct 2012 at 10:24pm v.c. wrote:
Nothing sinister - just a typo - we have sacked the proof reader! If you need to read it off the back of the programme then you are not a real Bonfire Boy! (Although some egits think it goes Oggy Oggy Oggy!)
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On 22 Oct 2012 at 11:01pm Bonfire Boy wrote:
Same with the Borough and Waterloo programmes too!
 
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 12:05am padster wrote:
God works in mysterious ways!
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 6:44am Yawn wrote:
Because Borough and Waterloo do not do the second verse. Waterloo never have and Borough stopped it years ago!!
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 7:16am Paul wrote:
To v.c that is why oggy was started cos the other societies don't do the last verses cos it offends some people so get a grip and worry about the other long outstanding tradition of the drop downs in the streets
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 9:23am Proper Bonfire wrote:
Paul I always thought Oggy Oggy was a Rugby chant and I have NEVER heard it used to cover up the long standing tradition of Bonfire Prayers before. Wouldn't have thought anyone at the Town Hall would have been offended, the majority were "proper" bonfire people. There are many other things within bonfire to be offended about, some people find white people blacking up as Zulus offensive - will you be going round with a pack of makup wipes on the 5th? Are you on the Bonfire PC brigade along with the DFL's and Antis? It's funny how the guy that started Oggy Oggying was called Paul - have you taken offence at v.c. calling you an egit?
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 10:46am Oggy oggy?? wrote:
I think Oggy Oggy actually was for Cornish workers down the tin mines being alerted that their pasties were ready but I could be wrong.
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 10:49am Bonfire Police wrote:
Paul Oggy Oggy has no place in bonfire its a ruby song and it seems to be Borough singing it most of the time after you instigate it, its awful and does offend !!
Why do it ? Stick to the true elements of Bonfire and leave the ruby chanting to the ruby pitch etc and think you will be called an egit for singing it
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 10:58am Proper Bonfire wrote:
You are right "Oggy oggy??" it was used down the mines.
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 11:15am Ticket wrote:

I seem to remember that 'Oggy Oggy' was first chanted in Lewes on the 5th during the mid 1970s ? Max Boyce used it in his shows, probably one of the worst comedians to appear on TV, nothing funny about him or the 'oggy' chant :-)
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 11:55am Oggy wrote:
@ bonfire police!! What's a ruby??????????? And if you don't like it don't do it!! Proper bonfire people!! Some are also Catholics as well!! And why should societies that don't chant the 2nd verse do it to keep others happy????? And at least v.c and bonfire police, Paul actually put his name to his comment unlike the rest of you cutless twits
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 12:01pm Oggy wrote:
Gutless!! No bottle!! Same person different name to hide under, person with chip on shoulder!! If you have something to say do it to a persons face
 
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 12:10pm Paul wrote:
Thank you oggy, but anyway am I the only bloke called Paul around here then and yes his name was Paul and yes borough and waterloo dont do the last verses but not only that borough are not the only society that do oggy oggy anyway v.c you skated round the other point I said and that was about drop downs
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 12:29pm Common Knowledge wrote:
Sheriff John Stone
Why don't you leave me alone woh wohne
This is the worst forum
I've ever been on
Bananas bananas....................
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 1:21pm Another Paul wrote:
Having processed to the firesite at Nevill on Saturday, just in front of Borough, I have to say that the incessant chanting of "Oggy Oggy Oggy - Oi Oi Oi" was incredibly irritating. Do these people not realise how stupid this chant makes them look. (coupled with a blue and white jumper, that is pretty stupid indeed!) I dare say, that had I looked a little closer, the chanters would have been wearing their trousers slung low with their underpants showing!
OOO-OOO has no place in bonfire and should be stopped.
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 2:00pm CSBS wrote:
We were behind and yes it was incredibly irritating, we banned it yrs ago
 
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 2:48pm Deelite wrote:
Look like the cry on the 5th might be Soggy, soggy, soggy
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 3:00pm Pete wrote:
Can you imagine how bad they will all smell afterwards?
Pasties, wet pullovers, tight sweaty trousers and sour breath?
No kids of bonfire conceived that night I think!
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 5:16pm Pasty wrote:
@csbs you were behind on the first procession with all your gold and black bumble bees!! At least the youngsters are allowed to enjoy them selves!! No chavs just children and families!! It wasn't southover or south st in front and we all know Waterloo were arrogant and disrespected nevill by pushing to the front of all the visiting societies!! When they were placed with there teenage and early 20yr old chavs!! And of course that just leaves the few of cliffe that turn out from the pubs and just dress in smugglers!! Grow up!! Different societies different groups!! At least it kept the kids happy in the rain
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 5:47pm Local Historian wrote:
The origins of the bonfire prayers can be traced back as far as 1976 when Fogdens first started selling red an white rugby tops. This event was swiftly followed by the introduction of flaming torches into the nights processions, though Southover strongly resisted this and carried on with the long held tradition of carrying a rolled up copy of 'time out'.
During the mid 1980's infighting led to two breakaway groups forming Cliffe and Borough and these still exist to this day.
Due to logistical problems of bonfire night not always falling on Saturday, in 1993 it was moved to August bank holiday Monday where it is celebrated to this day
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 6:22pm jackme off wrote:
At last someone talking some sense on here well said sir?
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 7:03pm Paul wrote:
So if these people that are moaning about oggy oggy why don't you stop fighting amongst yourselves and put all your fight into trying to stop the interfering bigots from stopping the drop downs
 
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 9:34pm V.c. wrote:
Paul I do worry about the tradition of drop downs in answer to your question. As I do any watering down of Bonfire traditions.
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 10:13pm DFL-ish wrote:
i was reading through this and noticed that the term DFL was used to describe the PC bonfire, but i myself am a 'DFL' im only a teenager but came down a number of years back, this is my 7th bonfire and me and my family have embrassed bonfire and helped as much as we could, im on my socities tab team, did torch making in the past, and program selling, as does my brother, and my dad was a torch marshal and my mum did charity collecting, all on nevill by the way, so please dont sterotype to much as not all DFL's should be pushed aside as secend class on bonfire issues
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On 23 Oct 2012 at 10:36pm Rookie Ron wrote:
Well done sunshine, now get on with your homework and stop fishing for compliments.
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 2:38am padster wrote:
Oggy, who are these Catholics who are members of bonfire societies.......i hear this rubbish a lot, I know of no Catholics who are members of said bonfire societies. Its a bit like nick griffin saying Iā??m not racist some of my best friends are black.
Bonfire is about the success of the reformation and the establishment of the head of the Christian church in England being the monarch and not the Pope thatā??s the history and enjoy it but donā??t be all touchy feely about it if your going to put no popery banners accross the road and burn the effigy of the pope then do so but stop pretending it's not offensive to Catholics because it is.
Be proud of your bigotry or should I say have the guts to be what you are. Itā??s a free country.
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 6:56am I'm not a Catholic wrote:
Pasty, I think you'll find that the Cliffe are the one society that do bother to wear costumes other than smugglers at out meetings. My mother who is in the Borough despairs at the amount of smugglers in the Borough ranks on the 5th. Padster, there are Catholics in the societies, I have seen them.
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 8:32am me myself and wrote:
"I think you'll find that the Cliffe are the one society that do bother to wear costumes other than smugglers at out meetings". in the words of Andy Millman. Are you having a laugh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!. Borough usually have 1 maybe 2 Zulus and some elizabethan (Is that right). Waterloo usually have a fair smattering of Ghenkis Kahn. Commercial Usually find the best pub and proceed to march around there in their Guernseys, Cliffe seem to find the best pub, but they do get a little closer to the procession by standing in the car park and watching/cracking jokes about other societies that have ben said a million times before, and yet they still think they are funny/cool. South Street will usualy have a few costumes out, southover May have a few costumes out. Even Nevill have costumes out. So by stating that Cliffe are the ONE society that have costumes at outfires, is not just laughable, it's complete fabrication although I do conceed they are not the worst for the smuggler/beer combo. Although not quite in this topic, I still laugh at Cliffes improvised badge at Seaford last year, so you do get some Kudos for that.
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 1:24pm Penguin wrote:
Why all this bickering about costumes? Bonfire is Bonfire, not a fancy dress competition. That was at the Town Hall last week. The original costume worn by everyone was the smuggler, so why is it such a bad thing to continue the tradition by wearing it now? The whole point being that the costume was worn as a disguise, so that everyone looked the same. It was not an excuse to strut down the road in a fabulous feather covered creation that makes you look like Carmen Miranda on acid! Yes, the Bonfire costume has evolved over the years, but that does not mean that the original is any less valid, or that it should be looked down upon (as long as it's not a rugby shirt of course!)
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 3:05pm Ed Can Do wrote:
Padster, I'm a catholic and a member of two bonfire societies. If you go to St Pancras church on any given weekend I could probably point out at least ten society members in the congregation. I find your holier than thou attitude and presumtpion to speak for every follower of a given religion more than a little disturbing and the kind of rhetoric one would expect from a radical extremeist, not someone trying to inform a reasonable debate. Please take your bigotry elsewhere and accept that not everyone is as willfully small minded as you are.
 
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 4:35pm padster wrote:
Ed I find your comments way over the top and to suggest I am an extremists is offensive and laughable. Do you go to the know popery lectures? Do you go to mass ? I would like you to tell me why your Catholicism sits comfortably with the origins of bonfire ? I don't speak for everyone but I know no members of regular mass goers who are bonfire members. I am not small minded either maybe ed you should piss of to the Presbyterians you'll be more happy there with your torch burning mass mocking traditions. T.W.A.T
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 5:45pm Annette Curtin-Twitcher wrote:
I know at least 3 Catholics in bonfire (2 of them in Cliffe) but I doubt if they go to mass. They have no trouble celebrating the overthrow of the despotism that was 16th century Catholicism and reconciling that with their faith.
Should add, I realise the alternative was just as bad in some ways, but there's no doubt in my mind that the advent of William and Mary was ultimately a good thing, taken overall.
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On 25 Oct 2012 at 8:34pm Bruciare il Papa wrote:
Oggy oggy oggy is vile and I wish all chanters were strung up.
Oh, and there are quite a few Roman Catholics in Cliffe - one of "them" even held a committee position (but keep it quiet!).
 
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On 27 Oct 2015 at 2:36pm Each to their own.. wrote:
A point rather a few seem to be missing... Bonfire wouldn't be bonfire without differences, smugglers and beverages. The variety of costumes that a society turns up to an out fire with does not in any way reflect on that society. Each member makes their own choice what to wear - quite often weather influenced may I add. Yes some march and some stay in the pub but again it's a personal choice... Personally I really don't see the issue with society members turning up to another society's night dressed in Smuggler and marching or not marching. Most people work bloody hard on their own night and an out fire is a perfect opportunity to socialize with people you may not see on the 5th and let your hair down.


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Swan penny 112:132
Swan penny

As expected the chartist only turns up to put down. Just like the ferret. more
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